• Ruth Group: April, May and June Book Selections

    April 15, May 20, and June 10

    We have two books and a planning brunch coming up this spring. Please join us!

    April 15: The Weight of Ink by Rachel Kadish

    “An intellectual and emotional jigsaw puzzle of a novel.” Hosted by Karen Roberts, 3 Kenilworth Rd Winchester. Facilitator: Teresa Cader (see book description below)

    May 20: Born a Crime by Trevor Noah

    Hosted by Natalie Roche, 124 Highland Ave. Facilitator: MaryAnn McCall-Taylor. “Trevor Noah was born to a white Swiss father and a black Xhosa mother at a time when such a union was punishable by five years in prison. Born a Crime is the story of a mischievous young boy who grows into a restless young man as he struggles to find himself in a world where he was never supposed to exist.” (see book description below)

    June 10: Planning Brunch

    Join us in the Tucker room immediately following the end-of-year all-church picnic for a discussion of book recommendations to read for the next year – there are so many good books to choose from!

    All women of the church and community are welcome. You don’t even have to read the book – just come for the discussion and companionship. New participants are always welcome. Decaf coffee & tea and simple desserts are offered by the host. Contact Anne Hoenicke and Kaye Nash, this year’s co-coordinators, with any questions you may have and to figure out possible carpools. Curious about Ruth Group? Read on!

     


    Weight of Ink by Rachel Kadish

    Winner of a National Jewish Book Award
    An intellectual and emotional jigsaw puzzle of a novel

    Set in London of the 1660s and of the early twenty-first century, The Weight of Ink is the interwoven tale of two women of remarkable intellect: Ester Velasquez, an emigrant from Amsterdam who is permitted to scribe for a blind rabbi, just before the plague hits the city; and Helen Watt, an ailing historian with a love of Jewish history.

    As the novel opens, Helen has been summoned by a former student to view a cache of seventeenth-century Jewish documents newly discovered in his home during a renovation. Enlisting the help of Aaron Levy, an American graduate student as impatient as he is charming, and in a race with another fast-moving team of historians, Helen embarks on one last project: to determine the identity of the documents’ scribe, the elusive “Aleph.”

    Electrifying and ambitious, sweeping in scope and intimate in tone, The Weight of Ink is a sophisticated work of historical fiction about women separated by centuries, and the choices and sacrifices they must make in order to reconcile the life of the heart and mind.

    About the Author: Rachel Kadish is the award-winning author of the novels The Weight of Ink, From a Sealed Room, and Tolstoy Lied: A Love Story, as well as the novella I Was Here. Her work has appeared on NPR and in the New York Times, Ploughshares, and Tin House. She lives outside of Boston.

     


    Born a Crime by Trevor Noah

    #1 NY Times Bestseller
    The compelling, inspiring, and comically sublime story of one man’s coming-of-age, set during the twilight of apartheid and the tumultuous days of freedom that followed.

    “Trevor Noah’s unlikely path from apartheid South Africa to the desk of The Daily Show began with a criminal act: his birth. Trevor was born to a white Swiss father and a black Xhosa mother at a time when such a union was punishable by five years in prison. Living proof of his parents’ indiscretion, Trevor was kept mostly indoors for the earliest years of his life, bound by the extreme and often absurd measures his mother took to hide him from a government that could, at any moment, steal him away. Finally liberated by the end of South Africa’s tyrannical white rule, Trevor and his mother set forth on a grand adventure, living openly and freely and embracing the opportunities won by a centuries-long struggle.

    Born a Crime is the story of a mischievous young boy who grows into a restless young man as he struggles to find himself in a world where he was never supposed to exist. It is also the story of that young man’s relationship with his fearless, rebellious, and fervently religious mother—his teammate, a woman determined to save her son from the cycle of poverty, violence, and abuse that would ultimately threaten her own life.”

    The stories collected here are by turns hilarious, dramatic, and deeply affecting. Whether subsisting on caterpillars for dinner during hard times, being thrown from a moving car during an attempted kidnapping, or just trying to survive the life-and-death pitfalls of dating in high school, Trevor illuminates his curious world with an incisive wit and unflinching honesty. His stories weave together to form a moving and searingly funny portrait of a boy making his way through a damaged world in a dangerous time, armed only with a keen sense of humor and a mother’s unconventional, unconditional love.

    Praise for Born a Crime

    “[A] compelling new memoir . . . By turns alarming, sad and funny, [Trevor Noah’s] book provides a harrowing look, through the prism of Mr. Noah’s family, at life in South Africa under apartheid. . . . Born a Crime is not just an unnerving account of growing up in South Africa under apartheid, but a love letter to the author’s remarkable mother.”—Michiko Kakutani, The New York Times

     “What makes Born a Crime such a soul-nourishing pleasure, even with all its darker edges and perilous turns, is reading Noah recount in brisk, warmly conversational prose how he learned to negotiate his way through the bullying and ostracism. . . . What also helped was having a mother like Patricia Nombuyiselo Noah. . . . Consider Born a Crime a gift to her—and an enormous gift to the rest of us.”—USA Today

    “[Noah’s] electrifying memoir sparkles with funny stories . . . and his candid and compassionate essays deepen our perception of the complexities of race, gender, and class.”—Booklist

    “A gritty memoir . . . studded with insight and provocative social criticism . . . with flashes of brilliant storytelling and acute observations.”—Kirkus Reviews

    If you enjoyed this article, please consider sharing it!Share on Facebook
    Facebook
    Tweet about this on Twitter
    Twitter
    Share on LinkedIn
    Linkedin
    Email this to someone
    email

Comments are closed.